Oracle … as usual

Oracle by Laurent Leturgez

Database Load heatmap with AWR and Python

Recently, one of my customer asked me to design him a tool to quickly see the database load. He already did that for another Rdbms with a heatmap.

To do that, I used two distinct part in my work: Data Extraction, and Data Vizualisation.

Data Extraction from AWR

As he has licensed his databases with the Diagnostic pack , I decided to use AWR repository, and as I’m a bit lazy, I found a query from Marcin Przepiorowski (@pioro) and I modified it to pivot data.


col "00-01_ " for 90.99
col "01-02_ " for 90.99
col "02-03_ " for 90.99
col "03-04_ " for 90.99
col "04-05_ " for 90.99
col "05-06_ " for 90.99
col "06-07_ " for 90.99
col "07-08_ " for 90.99
col "08-09_ " for 90.99
col "09-10_ " for 90.99
col "10-11_ " for 90.99
col "11-12_ " for 90.99
col "12-13_ " for 90.99
col "13-14_ " for 90.99
col "14-15_ " for 90.99
col "15-16_ " for 90.99
col "16-17_ " for 90.99
col "17-18_ " for 90.99
col "18-19_ " for 90.99
col "19-20_ " for 90.99
col "20-21_ " for 90.99
col "21-22_ " for 90.99
col "22-23_ " for 90.99
col "23-24_ " for 90.99

WITH t AS
  (SELECT TO_CHAR(mtime,'YYYY/MM/DD') mtime,
    TO_CHAR(mtime,'HH24') d,
    LOAD AS value
  FROM
    (SELECT to_date(mtime,'YYYY-MM-DD HH24') mtime,
      ROUND(SUM(c1),2) AAS_WAIT,
      ROUND(SUM(c2),2) AAS_CPU,
      ROUND(SUM(cnt),2) AAS,
      ROUND(SUM(load),2) LOAD
    FROM
      (SELECT TO_CHAR(sample_time,'YYYY-MM-DD HH24') mtime,
        DECODE(session_state,'WAITING',COUNT(*),0)/360 c1,
        DECODE(session_state,'ON CPU',COUNT( *),0) /360 c2,
        COUNT(                               *)/360 cnt,
        COUNT(                               *)/360/cpu.core_nb load
      FROM dba_hist_active_sess_history,
        (SELECT value AS core_nb FROM v$osstat WHERE stat_name='NUM_CPU_CORES'
        ) cpu
      WHERE sample_time > sysdate - 30
      GROUP BY TO_CHAR(sample_time,'YYYY-MM-DD HH24'),
        session_state,
        cpu.core_nb
      )
    GROUP BY mtime
    )
  )
SELECT mtime,
  NVL("00-01_ ",0) "00-01_ ",
  NVL("01-02_ ",0) "01-02_ ",
  NVL("02-03_ ",0) "02-03_ ",
  NVL("03-04_ ",0) "03-04_ ",
  NVL("04-05_ ",0) "04-05_ ",
  NVL("05-06_ ",0) "05-06_ ",
  NVL("06-07_ ",0) "06-07_ ",
  NVL("07-08_ ",0) "07-08_ ",
  NVL("08-09_ ",0) "08-09_ ",
  NVL("09-10_ ",0) "09-10_ ",
  NVL("10-11_ ",0) "10-11_ ",
  NVL("11-12_ ",0) "11-12_ ",
  NVL("12-13_ ",0) "12-13_ ",
  NVL("13-14_ ",0) "13-14_ ",
  NVL("14-15_ ",0) "14-15_ ",
  NVL("15-16_ ",0) "15-16_ ",
  NVL("16-17_ ",0) "16-17_ ",
  NVL("17-18_ ",0) "17-18_ ",
  NVL("18-19_ ",0) "18-19_ ",
  NVL("19-20_ ",0) "19-20_ ",
  NVL("20-21_ ",0) "20-21_ ",
  NVL("21-22_ ",0) "21-22_ ",
  NVL("22-23_ ",0) "22-23_ ",
  NVL("23-24_ ",0) "23-24_ "
FROM t pivot( SUM(value) AS " " FOR d IN ('00' AS "00-01",'01' AS "01-02",'02' AS "02-03",'03' AS "03-04",'04' AS "04-05",'05' AS "05-06",'06' AS "06-07",'07' AS "07-08",
                                          '08' AS "08-09",'09' AS "09-10",'10' AS "10-11", '11' AS "11-12",'12' AS "12-13",'13' AS "13-14",'14' AS "14-15",'15' AS "15-16",
                                          '16' AS "16-17",'17' AS "17-18",'18' AS "18-19",'19' AS "19-20",'20' AS "20-21",'21' AS "21-22", '22' AS "22-23",'23' AS "23-24") 
            )
ORDER BY mtime

Nota: this query can be used to extract Database Load, Active Average Session (AAS), CPU part of AAS, and the Wait part of AAS. You just have to replace the value alias in the WITH Block.

Another point, I didn’t look at the plan, so I didn’t tune the statement … if you have some tricks to tune it … feel free to comment 😉

This query gives this kind of result:

MTIME      00-01_  01-02_  02-03_  03-04_  04-05_  05-06_  06-07_  07-08_  08-09_  09-10_  10-11_  11-12_  12-13_  13-14_  14-15_  15-16_  16-17_  17-18_  18-19_  19-20_  20-21_  21-22_  22-23_  23-24_
---------- ------- ------- ------- ------- ------- ------- ------- ------- ------- ------- ------- ------- ------- ------- ------- ------- ------- ------- ------- ------- ------- ------- ------- -------
2016/11/23    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.03    0.03    0.00    0.04    0.02    0.00    0.00    0.04    0.01    0.01    0.01    0.04    0.01
2016/11/24    0.02    0.03    0.01    0.03    0.05    0.02    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00
2016/12/06    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.01    0.01    0.02    0.02    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00
2016/12/07    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.01    0.00    0.00    0.04    0.03    0.01    0.02    0.01    0.02    0.01    0.01    0.06    0.03
2016/12/08    0.03    0.05    0.02    0.02    0.03    0.03    0.02    0.02    0.03    0.02    0.01    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00
2016/12/12    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.03    0.02    0.05    0.02
2016/12/13    0.03    0.01    0.01    0.01    0.02    0.03    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00
2016/12/14    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.02    0.02    0.02    0.02    0.18    0.03    0.02    0.01    0.01    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00

When the result is greater than 1, your database is loaded, but if it’s greater or equal that 2 … it’s really overloaded. In both cases, you have to analyze why ?

The problem with this kind of results is it’s only numbers and you have to analyze the complete results to detect when the problem occurs, here comes the data vizualisation part 😉

Data Vizualisation with Python

On the Oracle database Area, a guy has made a lot for visualization of performance data, it’s Kyle Hailey (@dbavigil). And Visualize your data is a very important thing to quickly identify bottleneck. So if you’re interested by data vizualisation you can visit his blog, you will find a lot of resources to extract AWR data and to visualize them (and other stuff).

So I decided to use Python to vizualise database load data extracted previously. To do that, I used python 3.4.5 with a bunch of packages installed:

  • cx_Oracle to connect Oracle Database and execute queries on your Oracle Database
  • numpy for arrays manipulation
  • plotly to graph the heatmap

The python script is available by following this URL: https://app.box.com/s/irjzi64lbne6xhw3t57aixqiy95toxht. Then, you have to modify it to enter the connection string (line 33).

My customer asked me that my script generates an HTML file  to visualize the heatmap in a browser (One of the reason I used plotly).

This script generates the file in /var/tmp (but you can modify it at the end) and then open the browser locally (So don’t forget to export X11 display if you run it on a linux server).

Below you can see the heatmap (X Axis is the hour range, Y Axis represent a day analyzed, the most recent day is on the first line of the heatmap.).

heatmap_s

This heatmap will help my customer to quickly visualize his database load, I hope it will help you too ;).

Of course, you can use the tool of your choice to visualize data (Tableau, Excel, Kibana etc.)

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: